After a Stop to Smell the flowers….

Harry Potter and Deathly Hallows Part 1 starts with a pseudo montage:

The packing of the Dursley van

Ron sporting a concerned version of one of his two signature looks

(if not “sheepish grin” then bewilderment mingled with indignation)

and the scene that is the spark behind this post:

Hermione wipes her parents’ memory of her existence.

In doing so, the girl who is often labeled the “ brightest witch of her age”, along with the not so civilized term, “mudblood” has finally severed her last connection to the muggle world.

This concept came to mind after starting the film from the scene during which Harry tries to coax a smile from Hermione in the wake of Ron’s decision to go rogue.

There is much to say about the moment we see Harry take Hermione by the hand for a dance all the way through to the cold and flattened expression she wears once they pull away from the 30 second tryst with happiness.

However, it is when they ultimately end up in the forest of Dean, and she jokes with harry about staying in the place where she knows so well, yet if the people (her parents) she shared it with were to return, they’d remember nothing, including her.

She states, “Maybe we should just stay here; Grow old” which in many cases indicates the life you share with a significant other, if not marriage.

It was in this moment that the full extent of Hermione’s dedication to learning, to the greater good, and to Harry himself became overtly apparent after the most subtle sequence of events.

Hermione has openly and appropriately deemed harry as her best friend, and although Harry would rank Ron above her in that category, it is only by a minor default and frankly, the sentiment is certainly shared to some extent.

In many ways, some can agree that Ron was not the ideal for Hermione, but in him being present, he got the girl.

This basic overview of the following analysis on the relationship dynamics of Harry, Hermione, and Ron is only the tip of ice berg.

First Impressions

Pointing a wand and a steady hand directly at Harry’s forehead, Hermione confidently speaks, “occulus reparo” and at once, the glasses that were always broken repair themselves without moving off the bridge of Harry’s nose. Without waiting for him to speak, she chirps “that’s better isn’t it?”Excited to meet Harry and looking slightly let down and confused, she makes Ron’s acquaintance, and runs along after informing him that his face was dirty.

 

From the opening we see that Hermione’s initial reason for performing the spell was simply to demonstrate that she could, only after Ron had failed to perform one himself. Had she wanted to embarrass him further, she could have performed a cleaning spell on his face, however she opted to fix the glasses on Harry’s face, before she even knew who he was. Regardless of this, we know that her initial spell was not for Harry the boy who lived, but simply the boy sitting next to the boy who failed to impress her with his magical ability. She does go a step further in showing both of them her Type A nature, informing them they should change into their robes, but blatantly shows Ron her lack of excitement in making his acquaintance.

If the rules of first crushes apply, we know Hermione was playing the old ‘not impressed’ game so that Ron would not pick up on any interest. We also see that she did not hesitate to recognize Harry’s status while proclaiming her name as if it held the same weight most likely due to her confidence in her intellect.

In short, this scene can be chalked up to how Harry would be a good friend/teammate/person to acquainted with, meanwhile Ron was not someone who she could show even the slightest bit of affection despite a mutual acceptance that through their loyalty to Harry, they would have to, for the time being at least, tolerate the others existence.

That is of course until that fateful time when their union, which at times seemed inevitable, and others a forgotten thought, is the final result of such an epic series of books, and films.